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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)
not fair. for ideas to solve the problems and the deficit at the same time, bob rob an and larry summers suggested some away raise capital gains taxes. lets stop giving capital preferences over earned income. it's only fair and right. it won't solve the problem but will go a long way. back to john boehner. he doesn't say anything about this, because he refuses to raise rates. it can only be because he refuses to see the real problem. joining me now congressman thank you for joining us as always. >> thank you. am i right about the boehner proposal and what the underlying problems are. >> you are. also it's also true with the boehner proposal is it's not specific. he makes the general claim that will put $800 billion of revenuen oh the table but doesn't say from where. he wants to do tax code changes. that could mean it comes out of the middle class very easily. secondly, he ups the ante on cuts wants to cut mid care. boehner's in a box. he cannot sell to his caucus the idea of raising taxes when those guys ran against raising tasks and they in fact favored lowering them. what you're seein
agency fees does is it robs a union of the ability to clip dues off of all of the members who benefit from a union contract. instead of having a union contract where everybody who is covered from it has to pay a certain amount of money to the people negotiating the contract, people that are in the bargaining unit don't have to pay money. only those who wish to so it makes it difficult for unions to maintain themselves and have the resources for bargaining, politics and other forms of representation. so that's what really happens. what winds up happening in right-to-work states is that union density winds up being dramatically lower such as in the south. what epi found about a year ago is on average workers in right-to-work states, since there is lower union density they have less resources wind up making about $6,000 less a year than workers in states that are nonright to work. >> eliot: let me try -- you're saying so much. i want to distill it down and break out a couple of points. first, this is not a right-to-
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3 (some duplicates have been removed)